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Effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping in women with sacroiliac joint pain during active straight leg raising who habitually wore high-heeled shoes: a preliminary study

Lee JH , Yoo WG, Kim MH, Oh JS, Lee KS, Han JT. Effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping in women with sacroiliac joint pain during active straight leg raising who habitually wore high-heeled shoes: a preliminary study. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2014;37:260-268.

Effect of Posterior Pelvic Tilt Taping in Women With Sacroiliac Joint Pain During Active Straight Leg Raising Who Habitually Wore High-Heeled Shoes: A Preliminary Study


Jung-Hoon Lee, PhD
Won-gyu Yoo, PhD
Mi-hyun Kim, PhD
Jae-seop Oh, PhD
Kyung-soon Lee, PhD
Jin-tae Han, PhD

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this study was to assess whether a 1-day application of posterior pelvic tilt taping (PPTT) using a kinesiology tape would decrease anterior pelvic tilt and active straight leg raising test scores in women with sacroiliac joint who habitually wore high-heeled shoes.

Methods

Sixteen women (mean age, 23.63 ± 3.18 years) were enrolled in this study. Anterior pelvic tilt was measured using a palpation meter before PPTT application, immediately after PPTT application, 1 day after PPTT application, and immediately after PPTT removal after 1 day of application. Active straight leg raising scores were measured at the same periods. Posterior pelvic tilt taping was applied in the target position (posterior pelvic tilt position).

Results

The anterior pelvic tilt was decreased during and after 1 day of PPTT application (before and after kinesiology tape removal) compared with the initial angle (all P < .05). Active straight leg raising scores were decreased during and 1 day after PPTT application (before and after kinesiology tape removal) compared with the initial score (all P < .05).

Conclusion

The results of this preliminary study suggests that PPTT may temporarily decrease anterior pelvic tilt and active straight leg raising score in women with sacroiliac joint pain who habitually wear high-heeled shoes.


Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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